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Business AdministrationBusiness Law • EconomicsFinanceHospitality & Tourism ManagementManagementManagement Information SystemsMarketingSports Management
 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

BUS 103. FUNDAMENTALS OF BUSINESS
This course covers the basic business concepts, disciplines, and practices. It surveys major types of business institutions, functional areas of business organizations, and business processes. It provides an orientation into the modern business world for both future business majors and also for other majors.  NOTE: if taken by students with 24 hours or more, credit will not count for B.S. degree with a major in Accounting or Business Administration. Offered in both Fall and Spring semesters. One semester; three credits

BUS 160-164. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Each course is designed to permit intensive study into topics of special interest and timeliness in one or more areas of business administration. Offered as needed. One semester; one to three credits

BUS 205. Business Probability and Statistics
This course covers basic concepts and methods of probability and statistics for use in the business disciplines. Topics include: quantitative analysis, measurement scales, analysis and description of data, types and methods for probability estimation, probability distributions, and measures of central tendency, skewness, and dispersion. Use of computer spreadsheet models for probability and statistics is covered. Prerequisites: MIS 153, MATH 105 or higher, and admission to the Professional Studies program. One semester; three credits

BUS 206. Business Research Methods
This course covers the basic concepts and methods for business research. Topics covered include both primary research (observations, experiments, surveys, focus groups, etc.) and secondary research (library and internet literature searching). Research proposal and research report writing is also included. Sampling, data analysis, regression, and hypothesis testing is covered using computer spreadsheet models. Prerequisites: BUS 205 or STAT 221, MIS 153, MATH 105, and admission to the Professional Studies program. One semester; three credits.

BUS 260-264. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Each course is designed to permit intensive study into topics of special interest and timeliness in one or more areas of business administration. Offered as needed. One semester; one to three credits

BUS 360-364. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Each course is designed to permit intensive study into topics of special interest and timeliness in one or more areas of business administration. Offered as needed. One semester; one to three credits

BUS 499. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION
Seniors will be required to take a comprehensive examination in the student’s field(s) of concentration The examination date will be announced.  A passing score is required for graduation. Prerequisite: Dean of the School of Business.  Pass/Fail Grading.  One semester, zero credits. 

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BUSINESS LAW

BLAW 301. BUSINESS LAW I (Formerly BUS 301)
The origins and general survey of contract law along with the nature, formation, execution, and interpretation of contracts in the common law system. Emphasis is on instruction in legal principles that govern typical business situations and on the rules of law and procedure applied by the courts in the United States. Offered in both Fall and Spring semesters. One semester; three credits

BLAW 302. BUSINESS LAW II (Formerly BUS 302)
Continuation of BLAW 301. In-depth study of the Uniform Commercial Code and its far reaching effects on modern business transactions; the laws of agency, partnerships and corporations, and the legal concept of property. Offered in both Fall and Spring semesters. One semester; three credits

BLAW 345. LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS (Formerly BUS 345)
The course deals with administrative law. Primary areas of concentration include anti-trust law, consumer protection, securities regulation, labor law, and environmental law. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

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ECONOMICS

ECON 214. PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (Formerly ECON 212)
Attention is focused on the mirco concept of economic analysis, and primary attention given to the theory of the firm and partial equilibrium problems arising within any enterprise economy. Attention is also given to government regulation of business, the theory of income distribution as it pertains to the determination of wages, rents and profits, and international trade. Offered in both Fall and Spring semesters. One semester; three credits

ECON 215. PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS (Formerly ECON 211)
This course focuses attention on the aggregate or macroeconomic relationships and gives attention to the central problems of economic organization, the functioning of the price system, the economic role of government, the determination of national income, employment, the rate of inflation, and fiscal and monetary policy. Further, the student is introduced to the interactions between aggregate markets such as the product market, the factor/labor market, and the money market. Prerequisite: ECON 214. Offered in both Fall and Spring semesters. One semester; three credits

ECON 323.  THE ECONOMICS OF HEALTH AND HEALTHCARE
The course uses the tools of economic thinking and economic analysis to examine the current state of health and healthcare in the United States.  Economic concepts to be discussed include scarcity, rationing, the roles of the free market and government, sensitivity to price, determinants of the demand for, and the supply of, healthcare, and production possibilities.  These and other tools will be used to examine such topics as changing demographics, alternative production and delivery systems,  health insurance, regulation of the health sector, and the legal environment.  Prerequisite:  ECON 214 or consent of instructor. Offered as needed. One semester; three credits

ECON 325. ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS
This course will examine the emerging field of environmental economics - that is, the connections between economics and the environment. Topics will include the sources of environmental problems, the concept of natural capital, sustainable development, and how to balance environmental policy, economic growth and the constraints of a market based economic system. One semester; three credits

ECON 343. INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS
The theory of national income and employment, analysis of aggregate demand, the general degree of utilization of productive resources and the general level of prices as well as related questions of policy. Prerequisites: ECON 214, 215. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

ECON 344. INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS
A study of basic economic theory as it pertains to the individual economic units of a society, a study of the tools which are used in analyzing these units. Price determination, market analysis, and resource allocation are stressed. Prerequisites: ECON 214, 215. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

ECON 346. CURRENT ECONOMIC TOPICS
Analysis and discussion of current issues from an economic perspective. Possible subject areas include the environment, health care, comparative economic systems, welfare, growth and development, crime, religion and economics, and other current topics. The course may examine several current issues or may focus on just one or two. Offered as needed. One semester; three credits

ECON 347. SUSTAINABILITY, CULTURE, AND ECONOMICS
This course will examine the relationship bwtween these three topics by choosing one area of the world, such as Asia, Europe, and Latin America, and selecting specific countries in one of these areas for a micro and macro comparison. This course will includee optional travel to one of these areas during fall, winter, spring or summer break. One semester; three credits

ECON 400. ECONOMICS INTERNSHIP
Under the supervision of a faculty member from the appropriate department, students in the School of Business, after receiving the approval of the faculty, are placed in the offices of cooperating firms to receive on-the-job training under the supervision of members of the firm. Credit is granted upon acceptance of periodic reports and a final summary report of work done verified by the authorized supervisor and the instructor. Offered in the Fall and Spring. Pass/Fail grading. One semester; three credits

ECON 420. MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS
This courses focuses on  the application of economics theory to the problems and decisions faced by business managers in a market-oriented economy. The economic aspects of business departments such as marketing, finance, accounting, and law are explored and integrated into the applicable economic theories and models. Thus, in a very general sense, this course attempts to provide the student with a method of looking at the world of microeconomics through the eyes of an economist and from the perspective of a business person. Prerequisites: ECON 214, 215. Offered in both Fall and Spring semester. One semester; three credits

ECON 422. INTERNATIONAL TRADE and Economics
This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the principles of international trade, marketing, and finance. Specific topics which will be introduced include but are not limited to: tariffs, subsidies, import restrictions, foreign exchange, methods, agencies, and middlemen and business practices which influence trade relations. In addition, students will study the basics of the field of International Business including national differences in political economy and culture, global trade and investments, foreign direct investments, regional economic integration, foreign exchange markets, and strategic alliances. Prerequisites: ECON 214, 215. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

ECON 450. ECONOMICS POLICY
Application of economic theory and methodology to the study of decision making in both the political arena and various government agencies.  This will include the study of politics using the economic ways of thinking, various theories of justice and approaches to public policy, analysis of representative/democratic government, study of decision making inside bureaucracies, and development of the process of public policy formulation and implementation.  Among the policy areas covered will be an analysis of policy programs in the areas of education, welfare, and health care. Prerequisites:  ECON 214. Offered as needed. One semester; three credits

ECON 460-466. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS
The reading and discussion of significant economic literature. The course is designed to improve the student’s approach to modern economic problem solving and to stimulate economic thinking and the analysis of modern business problems. Prerequisites: ECON 214, 215. Offered as needed. One semester: three credits

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FINANCE

FIN 327. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT I
An introduction to the basic concepts, principles and analysis techniques of finance as applied to business organizations. The basis for virtually all financial analysis methodology lies in discounted cash flow analysis which is covered in this course. DCF techniques are then applied to areas of basic corporate decision-making involving the acquisition or replacement of physical assets and the decision to pursue capital projects. Finance 327 is a quantitative, problem solving course. Prerequisites: ACCT 260, ECON 215, MIS 153, MATH 105, and STAT 221. Offered in both the Fall and Spring semesters. One semester; three credits

FIN 340. INVESTMENTS (Formerly FIN 429)
Finance 340 covers the principles governing the selection of investment media, topics in modern portfolio theory, and techniques of analysis and evaluation as applied to various investment alternatives. The functioning of security markets and how financial assets are traded as well as valuation techniques for bonds, equity instruments, options and futures are covered. Emphasis is on gaining a more in-depth understanding of financial investment alternatives, their valuation and analysis. Prerequisite: FIN 327. Corequisite: FIN 340L. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

FIN 340L. INVESTMENTS TVA LAB
Students will meet in a lab environment to apply the concepts and principles governing the selection of equity securities by making investment recommendations – buy, hold, sell – used to invest the Tennessee Valley Authority’s $350,000 portfolio. Corequisite with FIN 340. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; one credit hour

FIN 346. PERSONAL FINANCE
The course is designed to acquaint the student with basic principles necessary to efficiently manage personal financial affairs. Special attention is given to the areas of budgeting, insurance, consumer credit, housing cost problems, and investment opportunities. This course cannot be used to fulfill any of the Finance requirements in the School of Business. Offered as needed. One semester; three credits

FIN 350. CAPITAL MARKETS AND INSTITUTIONS

Survey of financial markets and institutions and their individual characteristics; sources of supply of and demand for funds in each market, the complex interrelations among markets and the role of each in the process of capital formation and allocation. Prerequisites: FIN 327. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

FIN 400. FINANCE INTERNSHIP (Formerly BUS 400)
Under the supervision of a faculty member from the appropriate department, students in the School of Business, after receiving the approval of the faculty, are placed in the offices of cooperating firms to receive on-the-job training under the supervision of members of the firm. Credit is granted upon acceptance of periodic reports and a final summary report of work done verified by the authorized supervisor and the instructor. Pass/Fail Grading. One semester; three credits

FIN 410. DERIVATIVE SECURITIES
Structure, operation, and mechanics of trading in markets for futures, swaps, options, synthetic options, and futures on options; transfer of risk and stabilization of prices through futures trading; buying/selling strategies; valuation of futures contracts and options. Applications of derivatives to hedging and speculating strategies. Prerequisite: FIN 340. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

FIN 427. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT II (Formerly FIN 328)
Extends the knowledge of financial management and provides insights into the complexity of the decisions faced by practicing financial managers. Various topics are covered in the course with major emphasis on capital budgeting. Other topics covered include working capital management, international mergers and acquisitions, financial engineering, optimal capital structure, and enterprise value. Prerequisite: FIN 327. Offered in Spring semester. One semester; three credits

FIN 430-436. SPECIAL PROJECTS IN FINANCE
Readings and discussions of recent significant finance and investment literature. Possible subject areas include leveraged buyouts, mergers and acquisitions, junk bonds, speculative markets, fixed-income investments, foreign markets and exchanges, and hedging. Prerequisites: FIN 327, 340. Offered as needed. One semester; three credits

FIN 437. INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
The international aspects of financial management. Topics include currency markets and exchange rate determination, transfer of funds, banking services, international financial institutions, parity conditions, foreign exchange exposure and management, and valuation of international projects. Prerequisite: FIN 427. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

FIN 440. PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT
The analysis and valuation of securities and the selection, timing, diversification, and other aspects of supervising the management of investment portfolios. Students analyze the composition of, make buy/sell recommendations for, and evaluate the performance of a portfolio during the semester. Prerequisite: FIN 340. Corequistie: FIN 340L. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

FIN 440L. PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT TVA LAB
Students will meet in a lab environment to apply the concepts and principles governing the management of equity portfolios by making investment recommendations used to invest CBU’s Tennessee Valley Authority’s portfolio. Co requisite: FIN 440. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; one credit 

FIN 455. PRACTICUM AND PROJECT IN FINANCE
This course is designed to explore and put to practical use the entire body of knowledge gained in previous FIN courses.  Project Management concepts will be covered, including use of project management tools.  A comprehensive project will assess the student’s ability to apply classroom principles and skills to specific problems in the financial services professions.  Prerequisite:  Permission of the Instructor.  Offered in the Fall and Spring semesters.  One semester; three credits

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Hospitality & Tourism Management

HTM 410. INTRODUCTION TO TOURISM
In this course students are introduced to the basic dimensions of tourism on the basis of concrete practical examples, especially the various levels of tourism, the various perspectives from which it can be viewed, as well as the basic steps in creation of touristic products. Additional topics are the connection between supply and demand within the context of different parameters, such as regional culture; legal and political frameworks; economic and financial systems, the current financial climate, and climate change, energy concerns and environmental protection. Finally management approaches in keeping with these issues will be discussed, which will then be built upon in later stages of the students’ studies. One semester; four credits.  

HTM 420. APPLIED PROJECT IN TOURISM
Students will work independently in teams of 4-5 members to organize and complete a specific project. The topics will be interdisciplinary so as to interconnect the study program’s subject areas and promote interdisciplinary know-how.  The teams will be supported by an interdisciplinary faculty tandem. This didactic method is designed to maximize interdisciplinary interactions and support. Students will draw from the theoretical background they have received in previous courses in order to apply their knowledge of tourism and management. Project topics will vary from year to year. One semester; four credits.                                                                                                                                         

HTM 430. FOUNDATION IN HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT
Hospitality management is a key area in tourism, around which most other touristic products are clustered. For this reason a basic knowledge of the field is crucial to any tourism program.  In this course the basic elements of hospitality management will be explained, including personnel management, strategic and operative elements, legal frameworks and quality control measures. One semester; three credits.  

HTM 440. EVENT MANAGEMENT
In this course the psychological, organizational and social foundations necessary for staging events will be covered. New trends in the event sector will be explained on the basis of these foundations.  Basic technical knowledge needed to stage events will be discussed, such as 1) legal and business parameters; 2) the main technical and organizational considerations in mounting events; 3) entrepreneurial approaches to planning events, including budgeting of supplies, personnel, time and costs on the basis of concrete examples; 4) important risks connected with the mounting of events, such as accidents, as well as strategies to minimize these risks through the use of checklists and other means. One semester; one credit.

HTM 450 - 451. SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics in the Hotel, Restaurant, Tourism curricula.

HTM 455. PRACTICUM
This course is designed to explore and put to practical use the entire body of knowledge gained in previous HTM courses. A comprehensive project will assess the student’s ability to apply classroom principles and skills to specific problems in hospitality and tourism management. Prerequisite:  Permission of the Instructor. Offered in the Fall and Spring semesters.  One semester; three credits

MANAGEMENT

MGMT 250.   LEADERSHIP AND DIVERSITY
The intensive, year-long program is designed to develop leadership and interpersonal skills with the goal of informing positive social attitudes regarding the desirability and value of diversity in the community and the importance of community action. Topics include: leadership, civic responsibility, trust, problem-solving, critical thinking, communication, conflict resolution and human relations. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bridge Builders Junior Leadership Conference. Students will register for the course in the Spring semester. Three credits

MGMT 251.  LEADERSHIP AND SERVICE
The intensive, year-long program will provide students with an opportunity to design and implement a major service project at a local high school.  Students will provide leadership for the project by: conducting a needs assessment; identifying a specific need to address in their project; design, staff and implement the project; evaluate the effectiveness of the project; and, present their results to the community. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bridge Builders Senior Leadership Conference. Students will register for the course in the Spring semester. Three credits

MGMT 290. HONORS LEADERSHIP
Using a multidisciplinary approach to leadership, this class will include both theoretical and practical material from fields such as management, psychology, literature, history and religion. Students will develop their own philosophy of leadership and prepare themselves for leadership roles based on a thorough understanding of case studies and theoretical models. Prerequisite: membership in the Honors Program or permission of Honors Program Director and instructor. Offered as needed. One semester; three credits

MGMT 291-299. HONORS SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics in management open to members of the Honors Program or by permission of Honors Program Director and instructor. One semester; one to four credits

MGMT 300. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS & CULTURAL EXPERIENCE
This course introduces students to the business, political, economic, and cultural environments of a selected country. Experiential study, classroom lectures, and activities including site visits, guest lectures, and cultural experiences are integrated to develop a comprehensive understanding of the country selected. The course content includes a visit to the country selected for study. Open to all students. Students must have a valid passport. Course may be repeated for different countries. One semester; three credits

MGMT 320. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
An introduction to the field of international business and the implications of international trade and globalization upon American business. Topics include the comparison of political economies and cultures, global trade and investment strategies, foreign investment, regional economic integration, foreign exchange markets, strategic alliances and global marketing. Prerequisite: ECON 214 & 215 or ECE/CH E/CE/ME 314. Offered in both the Fall and Spring semesters. One semester; three credits

MGMT 339. OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT
An in-depth look at the production/operations functions of organizations. Topics will include product and process strategies, quality programs, location and layout strategies, inventory control techniques, and a comparison of the operational strategies used by both manufacturing and service organizations. The course will integrate quantitative modeling with business problem solving. Prerequisites: Junior standing and MGMT 352 and grade of “C” or better in STAT 222. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits 

MGMT 352. ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR AND MANAGEMENT
The psychology of organizations and their effect on individuals and groups. Topics include motivation theory, power and authority, communication, teamwork, leadership, job design and organizational structures. Other issues include globalization, cultural diversity, ethics and technology. Offered in both the Fall and Spring semesters. One semester; three credits

MGMT 400. MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP (Formerly BUS 400)
Under the supervision of a faculty member from the appropriate department, students in the School of Business, after receiving the approval of the faculty, are placed in the offices of cooperating firms to receive on-the-job training under the supervision of members of the firm. Credit is granted upon acceptance of periodic reports and a final summary report of work done verified by the authorized supervisor and the instructor. Pass/Fail Grading. One semester; three credits

MGMT 412. HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT
Personnel administration principles and philosophy. Man as employer and employee. Major topics include recruiting, hiring, training, promotion, health and welfare, and employee safety. In addition, the legal environment surrounding human resource issues will be studied. Prerequisite: MGMT 352. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

MGMT 430 ETHICAL DECISION MAKING IN BUSINESS
This course is an applied course in business and managerial ethics. Various ethical theories will be applied to contemporary business situations. In addition, the course will focus on raising the awareness of the student to ethical issues, principles and arguments by examining the social and corporate environment in which they will be living and working. Prerequisite: PHIL 220 (or equivalent), MGMT 352, MKTG 311 and FIN 327. Offered in both the Fall and Spring Semesters. One semester; three credits

MGMT 450. ORGANIZATION STAFFING AND DEVELOPMENT
Addresses the organizational staffing cycle from job analysis through recruitment, selection, employee development, career planning, retirement and downsizing. Legal issues pertaining to staffing are covered as well as the training process, including learning theory and technology as applied to training. Prerequisite: MGMT 412. Offered as needed. One semester; three credits

MGMT 451. ORGANIZATIONAL REWARD SYSTEMS
Analyzes the components of reward systems, including base pay, incentive pay, and employee benefits.  Development of pay plans, performance appraisal systems, various types of individual, group and organization-wide incentive programs, and outlines the various types of employee benefits. Prerequisite: MGMT 412. Offered as needed. One semester three credits

MGMT 452. EMPLOYEE AND LABOR RELATIONS/EMPLOYMENT AND LABOR LAW
Evolution of and current practices related to effective workplace relations between employer and employee in both union and non-union environments. The establishment and maintenance of  a safe, healthy, diverse and secure workplace. Legal issues related to Human Resources, including EEO, FLSA, ADA, ERISA, and federal and state labor laws are explored. Prerequisite: MGMT 412. Offered as needed. One semester three credits

MGMT 453.   SEMINAR IN GLOBAL BUSINESS
This course requires an international trip which provides students an opportunity to explore firsthand the international dimensions of business, to identify and pursue strategic issues in international business and trade, and to gain an awareness of how the cultural, economic, political, and legal environments influence business practices. Students study and conduct research on the country and prepare a report detailing business and cultural practices, political and economic environments. Other business and cultural research/analysis will be based on the emphasis of the course.  Students bear the costs of airfare, lodging and meals. Prerequisite: ECON 214 and ECON 215. Offered as needed. One semester; three credits

MGMT 455. PRACTICUM AND PROJECT IN MANAGEMENT
This course is designed to explore and put to practical use the entire body of knowledge gained in previous MGMT courses. Project Management concepts will be covered, including use of project management tools. A comprehensive project will assess the student’s ability to apply classroom principles and skills to specific management problems. Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor. Offered in both the Fall and Spring semesters. One semester; three credits

MGMT 460-466. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MANAGEMENT
These courses are designed to permit intensive study into topics of special interest and timeliness in the area of Management. Prerequisite: MGMT 352. Offered as needed One semester; three credits

MGMT 490. SEMINAR IN LEADERSHIP
Readings, critical evaluation and analysis of selected topics in current management literature, research and practice. Individual and group analyses and presentations of assigned topics. Major research project to be presented to faculty and senior students. Prerequisites: MGMT 352, MKTG 311, and FIN 327. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

MGMT 498. BUSINESS POLICY/STRATEGIC PLANNING
This course will consist of a series of lectures and practice exercises in research methods and case analysis. The study of corporate and business level policy and strategy making is developed using a top-management perspective. A research report along with case analysis papers will be prepared by each member of the class. In-class case assignments will be used for discussion and evaluation. Prerequisites: FIN 327;  MGMT 352; MKTG 311. Offered in both the Fall and Spring semesters. One semester; three credits 

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MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS COURSES

MIS 153. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER BUSINESS APPLICATIONS (Formerly ITM 153)
This course is intended to provide to students a working knowledge of modern computation and business information processing via the common tools of word processing, presentation, spreadsheet, and data base management. Information coverage will include text, numerical, graphical, and functional representations via common business applications such as break-even analysis, present value determination, depreciation schedules, loan amortization tables, etc. Depending upon the course section (day or evening, MWF or TT), all or a portion of this course may be offered in a distance education format. Offered in the Fall and Spring. One semester; three credits 

MIS 231. INTRODUCTION TO MIS (Formerly ITM 231)
This purpose of this course is to introduce the fundamentals of Management Information Systems. This course discusses components of information systems (hardware, software, databases, and data communication technologies) and uses examples and cases to demonstrate important uses of information systems in organizations. Topics include transaction processing, e-commerce, supply chain systems, customer relationship management systems, marketing information systems, decision support systems, knowledge management systems, and ethics and security issues. Depending upon the course section (day or evening, MWF or TT), all or a portion of this course may be offered in a distance education format. Prerequisite: MIS 153 (or passing of challenge exam) and MATH 105. Offered in the Fall and Spring. One semester; three credits 

MIS 271- 279. MIS SEMINARS
Through contractual arrangements with companies, government agencies, and/or organizations, the School of Business will offer courses on selected MIS topics. Students may take up to nine seminars as long as titles and content are clearly distinctive. Credit awarded may be used as free electives hours only. Enrollment is limited and requires permission of the Director of the associated program or Dean of the School of Business. Offered as needed. One semester; one, two, or three credits 

MIS 295. DATA COMMUNICATION, NETWORKS, AND CYBER SECURITY
This purpose of this course is to introduce the fundamentals of systems software, telecommunications, and network designs. It covers basic telecommunications concepts such as data transmission methods, signals encoding, transmission media characteristics, and the hybrid TCP/IP-OSI architecture, Ethernet LAN’s, wireless LAN’s and wide area networks as well as cyber security issues and standards. Prerequisite: MIS 231 and Math 105. Offered as needed. One semester; three credits 

MIS 351. SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (Formerly ITM 351) 
This course presents methods for analyzing and designing business IT systems. The course emphasizes the Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC) methodology. Classical and object oriented methods and tools are applied to business analysis and problem solving situations with adjustments as required to today’s business environment. Included are requirements analysis and use case analysis, process models, data models, consistency of process and data models, justification and costing techniques, conversion and implementation procedures. A case study is employed to provide a practical “hands-on” approach. Prerequisite: MIS 231 or permission of instructor. Offered as needed. One semester; three credits 

MIS 400/401. MIS INTERNSHIP
Under the supervision of a faculty member, students work on a real world project (“on-the-job-training”) either for a company, for CBU, or for a charity organization. Procedures and deliverables are defined on the School of Business Web site. Special CBU approval forms must be completed. A student may take two internships, but only one per organization. Prerequisite:  MIS 231, MIS 295, MIS 351. Offered as needed. One semester; three credits

MIS 455. INFORMATION SYSTEMS PRACTICUM AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT (Formerly ITM 455)
This course is designed to explore and put to practical use the entire body of knowledge gained in previous MIS courses. Topics will principally focus upon the managerial aspects of effective information technology deployment. Project Management concepts will be covered, including use of project management tools. A comprehensive  project will test student’s ability to apply technology and business skills to develop a workable, manageable, and effective information systems solution. Prerequisite: MIS 231, MIS 295, MIS 351, MIS 470, MIS 471 or permission of instructor. Offered as needed. One semester; three credits 

MIS 460-466 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MIS
Course designed to permit intensive study into topics of special interest and timeliness in the area of Management Information Systems Management. Prerequisites depend upon topics and approval of instructor. Offered as needed. One semester; three credits

MIS 470. APPLICATION AND WEB DEVELOPMENT (Formerly ITM 470)
This course familiarizes students with the modern web based application development and programming environment. It also teaches students the basics of key Internet  technologies (HTML, JavaScript, Dynamic HTML, CSS, ASP, PHP, AJAX, and XML), and trains students into the application and usage of key Internet tools. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to create and maintain modern advanced dynamic Web sites. Prerequisites: MIS 231, MIS 351, MIS 471, or permission of instructor. Offered as needed. One semester; three credits 

MIS 471. DATA BASE DESIGN AND BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE (Formerly ITM 471)
The course presents database design and management and emphasizes the relational model and Structured Query Language. Topics include database models, query languages, query optimization, database implementation, distributed processing, data mining, and business intelligence. Prerequisite: MIS 153 and MIS 231, or  permission of the instructor. Offered as needed. One semester; three credits

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MARKETING

MKTG 311. PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING
Addresses the marketing-management functions directed toward organizational customers and prospects who buy goods and services necessary for the operation of their own businesses. Concepts of purchasing strategy, material management, and organizational buying behavior are integrated into electronic developments, strategic alliances and partnerships, and just in time. Prerequisite: Junior standing and ECON 214. Offered in both the Fall and Spring semesters. One semester; three credits

MKTG 324. MARKETING RESEARCH AND INTELLIGENCE
The study of techniques and principles for systematically monitoring environments-collecting, recording, analyzing, and interpreting data that can aid decision makers who are involved with marketing of goods, services, or ideas. The application of intelligence and research findings in the development of marketing strategy is emphasized. The class employs research cases and projects to enhance students’ practical research and intelligence skills. Prerequisite: MKTG 311 and a grade of “C” or better in STAT 222.  Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

MKTG 334. MARKET AND CONSUMER BEHAVIOR
This investigation into consumer behavior brings together relevant research and applications from the behavioral sciences and other fields of marketing. The course will evaluate the decision process that individuals use as they obtain and use goods and services. The course will investigate the factors employed to identify and measure market segments. Emphasis is placed on an analysis of consumer behavior as a basis for marketing strategy. Prerequisite: MKTG 311. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

MKTG 338. SELLING AND SALES MANAGEMENT
This course will provide a detailed investigation of that portion of the Marketing Mix pertaining to promotion with specific emphasis on Personal Selling. While some discussion will be given to sales techniques, the major emphasis will be concerned with the management of the outside sales force and the activities of that sales force. Prerequisite: MKTG 311. Offered in both the Fall and Spring semesters. One semester; three credits

MKTG 348. BUSINESS TO BUSINESS MARKETING
Addresses the marketing functions directed toward organizational customers and prospects who buy goods and services necessary for the operation of their own businesses. Concepts of purchasing strategy, material management and organizational buying behavior are integrated into electronic developments, strategic alliances and partnerships, and JIT. Prerequisite: MKTG 311. Offered in both the Fall and Spring semesters. One semester; three credits

MKTG 400. MARKETING INTERNSHIP (Formerly BUS 400)
Under the supervision of a faculty member from the appropriate department, students in the School of Business, after receiving the approval of the faculty, are placed in the offices of cooperating firms to receive on-the-job training under the supervision of members of the firm. Credit is granted upon acceptance of periodic reports and a final summary report of work done verified by the authorized supervisor and the instructor. Pass/Fail Grading. One semester; three credits

MKTG 411. MARKETING POLICY AND STRATEGY
This course is designed to introduce students to the activities that are necessary for the organization to provide the products and/or services necessary to meet the company’s goals. The operations and supply chain managers are challenged to improve productivity while reducing costs, creating flexible processes that will meet the ever changing customer needs, and improving product and service quality. Emphasis will be placed on process strategies and analysis, quality and performance, inventory controls and lean systems, supply chain development and integration, location, and transportation analysis. The tools used will include forecasting, decision making, linear programming, inventory models, waiting line analysis, and project management models.This course is offered in the fall and spring semesters. One semester; three credits

MKTG 418. GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT
This course is designed to introduce students to the activities that are necessary for the organization to provide the products and/or services necessary to meet the company’s goals. The operations and supply chain managers are challenged to improve productivity while reducing costs, creating flexible processes that will meet the ever changing customer needs, and improving product and service quality. Emphasis will be placed on process strategies and analysis, quality and performance, inventory controls and lean systems, supply chain development and integration, location, and transportation analysis. The tools used will include forecasting, decision making, linear programming, inventory models, waiting line analysis, and project management models.  Prerequisite: MKTG 311. Offered in both the Fall and Spring semesters. One semester; three credit hours

MKTG 433. PROMOTIONAL STRATEGY
This course is designed to provide the student with the communication processes used in marketing. The course builds on the base of an understanding of consumer behavior by treating the fields of advertising, sales promotion, personal selling, reseller stimulation, and other communications skills as part of the overall promotional mix. The course develops fundamental considerations as a background to a focus on managerial issues and problems. The various communication methods are treated as variables to communicate the want satisfying attributes of products and services. Prerequisite: MKTG 311. Offered in both the Fall and Spring semesters. One semester; three credits

MKTG 438. INTERNATIONAL MARKETING.
This course provides the framework for marketing on a global basis.  Topics include: globalization and implications for marketing managers; international market entry decisions; partnering and alliances; pricing, product policy, and branding in the global market; standardization versus adaptation decisions in international marketing; and marketing research applications in global marketing. Prerequisite: MKTG 311 and MGMT 320. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credit hours

MKTG 440. ENTREPRENEURSHIP
This course provides a foundation for an understanding of the variables and functions in the start-up of new business ventures. More and more businesses are being started, and the opportunities are there for such actions. The development of strategic plans and feasibility studies are essential for successful introduction of new businesses. It includes the study of theory, while developing a practical knowledge of the marketing management system and key concepts for new ventures. This course is designed to enable new enterprises a stronger opportunity to achieve a higher quality of success. Prerequisites: MGMT 352 and MKTG 311. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits 

MKTG 455. PRACTICUM AND PROJECT IN MARKETING
This course is designed to explore and put to practical use the entire body of knowledge gained in previous MKTG courses.  Project Management concepts will be covered, including use of project management tools.  A comprehensive project will assess the student’s ability to apply classroom principles and skills to specific marketing problems.  Prerequisite:  Permission of the Instructor.  Offered in the Fall and Spring semesters. One semester; three credits

MKTG 460-466. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MARKETING
Courses are designed to permit intensive study into topics of special interest and timeliness in the area of marketing. Prerequisite: MKTG 311. Offered as needed. One semester; three credits

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SPORT MANAGEMENT

SMGT 300. SPORT FACILITY AND EVENT MANAGEMENT
Designed as an in depth study of the managerial activities related to sport facilities and even operations. This course will focus on facility design, planning, personnel, marketing facilities and events, developing revenue streams, scheduling, and operating. An emphasis is placed on utilizing available resources to achieve organizational goals. Offered in the Fall semester. Prerequisites: MIS 153 and Junior standing. One semester; three credits

SMGT 301. SPORT SPONSORSHIP AND SALES
Designed as an exploration of strategies and tactics utilized to sell and generate revenue in the business cycle. This course will focus on sales proposal development, sponsor solicitations, licensing rights, new business development, endorsements and corporate partnerships. The course also provides an examination of ticket sales department structure, techniques, and strategies Offer in the Spring semester. Prerequisites: MIS 153 and Junior standing. One semester; three credits

SMGT 410. MANAGEMENT OF SPORTS INDUSTRIES
Focuses on management concepts and business skills as they relate to the sports industry. An in-depth look at the organizational structure and method of operation of major sectors of the sports enterprise, examination of important contemporary issues in the sports industry and other administrative aspects of sports enterprises. Prerequisite: permission of the Dean of the School of Business. Offered in the Spring Semester. One semester; three credits

SMGT 420. MARKETING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS IN SPORTS
This course introduces students to marketing and public relations skills crucial to success in every sports business and examines the unique features of sports marketing that set sports apart from other industries. Prerequisite: permission of the Dean of the School of Business.  Includes marketing sport as a product and marketing non-sport products using sport as a promotional tool. Offered in the Fall Semester. One semester; three credits

SMGT 430. SPORTS INDUSTRIES AND THE LAW
Focuses on an analysis of legal problems and issues confronting the sports manager including suits against the organization, safety, collective bargaining and arbitration. Includes contract law, tort law, labor law, and administrative law as they apply to the sports industry. Prerequisite: permission of the Dean of the School of Business. Offered in the Fall Semester, beginning 2009-2010.

SMGT 440. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT FOR SPORTS ADMINISRATION
An examination of financial methods and procedures as they apply to sports administration, taxation, purchasing cost analysis, budgeting, and the financial problems associated with mass media. Topics covered include accounting principles, financial statements, industry ratios, securing funds and related concepts that help determine the viability and strength of businesses in the sports industry. Prerequisite: permission of the Dean of the School of Business. Offered as needed.

SMGT 455. PRACTICUM AND PROJECT IN SPORTS MANAGEMENT
This course is designed to explore and put to practical use the entire body of knowledge gained in previous SMGT courses. Project Management concepts will be covered, including use of project management tools. A comprehensive project will assess the student’s ability to apply classroom principles and skills to specific problems in the sports industry. Prerequisite: SMGT 410 and SMGT 420. Offered as needed.

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