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ENGLISH

ENG 100. DEVELOPMENTAL COMPOSITION I
Intensive work on basic grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, paragraph development, and reading skills designed to prepare students for ENG 111. Separate sections will be offered for native and non-native speakers. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

ENG 111. ENGLISH COMPOSITION I
An introduction to academic writing and critical reading. Writing sequences with practical application of specific strategies for invention, drafting, frequent revision, peer review, and editing. Offered in the Fall and Spring. Honors Program students typically take ENG 231 and 232 instead of ENG 111 and 112 and a literature course. One semester; three credits

ENG 112. ENGLISH COMPOSITION II
An introduction to argumentative strategies, research skills, and other applied writing. Students will write several short pieces and a research paper. Special sections which focus on a specific topic, such as “censorship” or “gender,” may be designated. Prerequisites: ENG 111. Offered in the Fall and Spring. Honors Program students typically take ENG 231 and 232 instead of ENG 111 and 112 and a literature course. One semester; three credits

ENG 211. INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE I
A study of the literary forms of the novel and the short story, including the reading of significant world novels and short stories. This course will include an emphasis on writing skills cultivated in ENG 111, 112. Prerequisites: ENG 111, 112. Offered in the Fall and Spring. One semester; three credits

ENG 212. INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE II
A study of the literary forms of drama and poetry, including the reading of significant world plays and poems. This course will include an emphasis on writing skills cultivated in ENG 111, 112. Prerequisites: ENG 111, 112. One semester; three credits

ENG 215. GATEWAY COURSE FOR MAJORS
A survey of the elements of poetry, drama, and fiction, and an introduction to contemporary critical approaches and MLA style. Will include an emphasis on writing about literature and incorporating critical research. For English, ECC, and English Education majors, this course is required before enrolling in any 300-400 level English course. One semester; three credits.

ENG 221. SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE I
A survey of the representative prose and poetry writers of Great Britain from the beginnings through the 18th Century. Fulfills ENG 211 requirements. Prerequisites: ENG 111, 112 or Permission of Department Chair. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

ENG 222. SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE II
A survey of the representative prose and poetry writers of Great Britain since 19th-century Romantic Period. Fulfills ENG 212 requirement. Prerequisites: ENG 111,112 or Permission of Department Chair. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

ENG 231. HONORS SURVEY OF WORLD LITERATURE I
A survey of significant prose and poetry writers of world literature from ancient times through 1600. This course will include an emphasis on writing skills. ENG 231 by itself can be substituted for ENG 111. Prerequisite: Membership in the Honors Program. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; four credits

ENG 232. HONORS SURVEY OF WORLD LITERATURE II
A survey of significant prose and poetry writers of world literature from 1600 through the present. This course will include an emphasis on writing skills. ENG 232 by itself can be substituted for ENG 112. ENG 231 and 232 together can be substituted for ENG 111, 112, and one of the following: ENG 211, 212, 221, or 222. Prerequisite: Membership in the Honors Program. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; four credits 

ENG 240-249. SPECIAL TOPICS
Topics vary with the instructor. Prerequisite: ENG 111,112 or ENG 231, 232. One semester; one to three credits 

ALL 300 AND 400 LEVEL COURSES ARE OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED ONE 200 LEVEL LITERATURE COURSE (211, 212, 221, 222, 231, 232). English, ECC, and English education majors must have completed ENG 215.

ENG 290-299. HONORS SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGLISH
Special topics in English open to members of the Honors Program or by permission of the instructor and Honors Director. One semester; three credits

ENG 315. HISTORY OF THE THEATRE
An in-depth study of the theatre including samples of dramatic literature from ancient Greece to the present. (Same as THEA 315) One semester; three credits

ENG 331. AMERICAN LITERATURE TO 1865
A study of the representative prose and poetry writers of American literature set against the political, religious, and philosophical backgrounds from the Colonial Period through the Romantic Period. One semester; three credits

ENG 332. AMERICAN LITERATURE FROM 1865
A study of representative prose and poetry writers of American literature set against the social, political, and philosophical backgrounds since the Romantic Period. One semester; three credits

ENG 339. EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH NOVEL
Extensive reading in novels by representative eighteenth-century British novelists such as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, and Sterne. One semester; three credits

ENG 340. NINETEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH NOVEL
Extensive reading in novels by representative nineteenth-century British novelists such as Austen, the Brontes, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy. One semester; three credits

ENG 341. NINETEENTH-CENTURY AMERICAN NOVEL
Extensive reading in representative nineteenth-century American novels, set against the social, political, and literary backgrounds of their times. One semester; three credits

ENG 342. AMERICAN ROMANTICISM
A study of the representative influences, characteristics, and figures of the American Romantic Movement from 1830 to 1860. One semester; three credits

ENG 343. LITERATURE OF THE AMERICAN SOUTH
A survey of Southern American literature, including its background and themes, with emphasis on twentieth-century writers such as Faulkner, Welty, and Warren. One semester; three credits

ENG 351. MODERN NOVEL
An examination of modern modes of fiction through representative novelists and the stylistic concepts that shape their expression. One semester; three credits

ENG 352. MODERN POETRY
A study of theory and representative poets in the United States, Great Britain, and Ireland from 1900 to the 1960s. One semester; three credits

ENG 354. MODERN DRAMA
An examination of modern American drama from 1880-1960, beginning with a survey of late nineteenth-century European works followed by an intensive study of major playwrights and movements of the twentieth century. One semester; three credits

ENG 361. AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE
A study of poetry and prose by representative African-American writers, reflecting the development of African-American literature in the United States. One semester; three credits

ENG 362. WOMEN IN LITERA
An examination of literature by women in light of feminist literary theory. One semester; three credits

ENG 371. BUSINESS WRITING
An examination of logical and psychological patterns of business communication and adaptation to varying audiences. A study of forms of written and oral communication in the business world from letters for both routine and problem situations to memos, proposals, short and long reports, in the context of relevant technologies. Offered in the Fall and Spring. One semester; three credits

ENG 373. ADVANCED COMPOSITION
A study of rhetorical theory and rhetorical models accompanied by advanced practice in composition. One semester; three credits

ENG 375. SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL WRITING
An examination of the principles of effective communication in industry, business, and government with emphasis on practical writing skills for technical articles, reports, proposals, and documentation. Heavy emphasis on the computer as the technical writer’s workspace. One semester; three credits

ENG 376. CREATIVE WRITING
A study of the major forms of poetry and fiction, specifically the short story, and an introduction to the stylistic and rhetorical aspects of those forms through study and practice. This class includes workshop of the students’ original work. ENG 111 and 112. One semester; three credits

ENG 377. INTRODUCTION TO DRAMATIC WRITING
A study of the major forms of drama and an introduction to the stylistics and rhetorical aspects of those forms through study and practice. The class will culminate in a workshop of the students’ own work. Prerequisite: ENG 111 and 112. One semester; three credits

ENG 378. INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY NONFICTION 
A study of the major forms of creative nonfiction and an introduction to the stylistics and rhetorical aspects of those forms through study and practice. The class will culminate in a workshop of the students’ own work. Prerequisite: ENG 111 and 112. One semester; three credits

ENG 379. INTRODUCTION TO SCREENWRITING
A study of the screen writing tradition in which students begin with the basics of visual storytelling, and then examine the two fundamental elements of drama – structure and character. The class will culminate in a workshop of the students’ own work. Prerequisite: ENG 111 and 112. One semester; three credits

ENG 380-389. SPECIAL TOPICS
Topics vary with the instructor. Prerequisite: ENG 111, 112, and one 200 level English course (211, 212, 215, 221, 222, 231, 232). One semester; one to three credits

ENG 390-399. HONORS ENGLISH SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics in English open to members of the Honors Program or by Permission of the instructor and Honors Director. One semester; one to four credits

ENG 401. WRITING POETRY WORKSHOP 
A study of the poetic tradition in which students work to find their own poetic voice through the application of various poetic techniques. Students will also workshop their own writing and actively critique the work of their peers. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: ENG 111 and 112. One semester; three credits 

ENG 431. LITERARY NONFICTION
An application of the tools often associated with writing fiction and poetry to both analyze and produce documents about actual people, places, and events. One semester; three credits

ENG 432. MEDIEVAL LITERATURE
A study of representative works, European as well as British, from the Medieval Period. One semester; three credits

ENG 440. CHAUCER
A study of Chaucer’s major works with emphasis on The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde. One semester; three credits

ENG 441. SHAKESPEARE
An extensive and intensive study of both the comedies and tragedies. One semester; three credits

ENG 442. RENAISSANCE LITERATURE
A study of the major poets and prose writers of the English Renaissance Period including Spenser, Marlowe, and others. One semester; three credits

ENG 443. MILTON
A study of Milton’s poetry with emphasis on Paradise Lost. One semester; three credits

ENG 444. RESTORATION AND THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY
Dryden, Pope, Swift, and Johnson together with minor writers in poetry, prose, and drama.  One semester; three credits

ENG 445. ROMANTIC PROSE AND POETRY
Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats-their practice and theory-as well as the Romantic essayists. One semester; three credits 

ENG 446. VICTORIAN PROSE AND POETRY
Tennyson, Arnold, Browning, Hopkins, Carlyle, Newman, Ruskin-their lyrics and essays. One semester; three credits

ENG 447. SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY POETRY
A study of the poets of the seventeenth century including Jonson, Donne, Herbert, Marvell, Herrick, Lady Mary Wroth, and Aemilia Lanyer. One semester; three credits 

ENG 450. CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE
A study of American and British fiction, poetry, and drama of the past twenty-five years. One semester; three credits

ENG 451. WRITING FICTION WORKSHOP 
A study of the prose tradition in which students work to find their own voice through the application of various narrative techniques. Focusing on the short story, students will workshop their own writing and actively critique the work of their peers. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: ENG 111 and 112. One semester; three credits 

ENG 460-469. SPECIAL TOPICS
Topics of special interest including Comic Drama, Literary Non-Fiction, Tragic Drama, Detective Fiction, Publishing History of the United States, Baseball in American Literature, etc. Topics vary with instructor. Prerequisite: one 200 level English class (211, 212, 215, 221, 222, 231, 232). One semester; one to three credits each

ENG 478. JUNIOR SEMINAR FOR CREATIVE WRITING MAJORS
A practical study of the application of creative writing in the academic and publishing world, including graduate schools, fellowships, colonies, conferences, and employment. This class will replace the tradition Junior Seminar. Students will produce a directed collection of writing in their track as well as participate in a public presentation. Prerequisite: junior standing. One semester; one credit

ENG 479. JUNIOR SEMINAR FOR ENGLISH MAJORS
This course should be taken in the Spring semester of the junior year. Students will examine contemporary critical approaches to literature and will engage in preliminary work on their senior seminar thesis. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; one credit

ENG 480. SENIOR SEMINAR FOR ENGLISH MAJORS
This course should be taken during the Fall semester of the senior year. In the course students will examine methods and approaches to literary research and will produce a major term paper, their senior thesis, on a writer or literary theme of their choosing. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

ENG 481. SENIOR PROJECT FOR CREATIVE WRITING MAJORS
A study of the methods and approaches to each student’s specific field of creative writing. Students will produce a portfolio of original works or one longer piece that will reflect their studies in creative writing. Students will also have a public reading of select works. Prerequisite: senior standing. One semester; three credits 

ENG 485. HONORS RHETORIC AND POWER
An exploration into how language reflects and interacts with society from a number of different angles, including (as they apply to language) definition, framing stereotypes, language taboos, powerful and powerless language. One semester; one to three credits

ENG 486. CASTINGS INTERNSHIP
Experience in editing CBU’s literary magazine. For edit3or(s) only. Students may enroll in this course more than one time. One semester; one to three credits

ENG 487. HONORS JOURNAL INTERNSHIP
Experience in soliciting submissions for and editing the Honors Journal. Prerequisite: Honors Program membership and Approval by the Honors Program Director. Students may enroll in this course more than one time. Pass/Fail Grading. One to two semesters; one to three credits

ENG 488. WRITING CENTER TUTOR PRACTICUM
A practical introduction to the problems and management of a writing center and to the skills of one-to-one intervention in the student’s writing process. Enrollment limited to Writing Center Tutorial Staff. Students may enroll in this course more than one time. Pass/Fail Grading. One semester; one credit.

ENG 489. INTERNSHIP
Major-related work experience through which students apply English subject matter skills to professional activity. Prerequisite: Junior standing and Permission of the English faculty. Offered in the Spring Semester. One hour per week in class required. One semester; three credits.

ENG 490-498. RESEARCH TOPICS IN ENGLISH
Original writing projects or independent study and research in literature pursued under the guidance of a member of the English faculty. Syllabus and credit hours contracted by the student with the English Department. One semester each; one to three credits each

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FRENCH

FREN 101. ELEMENTARY FRENCH I
Fundamentals of grammar and pronunciation, elementary conversation. Second semester includes reading and translation of texts of graded difficulty. Not open for credit to native speakers of French. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

FREN 102. ELEMENTARY FRENCH II
Fundamentals of grammar and pronunciation, elementary conversation. Second semester includes reading and translation of texts of graded difficulty. Not open for credit to native speakers of French. Offered in the Spring semester. Prerequisite: FREN 101. One semester; three credits

FREN 201. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I
A review of French grammar with composition and conversation. Second semester includes the reading of French short stories selected from French literature, designed to increase the student’s vocabulary and to contribute to his mastery of idiomatic constructions. Prerequisites: FREN 101, 102. Not open for credit to native speakers of French. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

FREN 202. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II
A review of French grammar with composition and conversation. Second semester includes the reading of French short stories selected from French literature, designed to increase the student’s vocabulary and to contribute to his mastery of idiomatic constructions. Prerequisites: FREN 201. Not open for credit to native speakers of French. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

FREN 301. COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION I
Continued study of French grammar and composition. Drill on idioms and difficult constructions with reading in French civilization. Prerequisites: FREN 201, 202 or the equivalent. Not open for credit to native speakers of French. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

FREN 302. COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION II
Continued study of French grammar and composition. Drill on idioms and difficult constructions with reading in French civilization. Prerequisites: FREN 201, 202 or the equivalent. Not open for credit to native speakers of French. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

FREN 311. SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE I
A survey of the chief French authors and their works from the beginnings through the Golden Age. Readings, lectures, discussions. Prerequisite: Two years of college French or the equivalent. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

FREN 312. SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE II
A survey of the chief periods and movements in French literature from the 18th to the 20th century. Reading in French of selections from the masterpieces of the principal authors of these centuries. Prerequisite: Two years of college French or equivalent. One semester; three credits 

FREN 313. FRENCH CIVILIZATION I
An overview of the chief historical, political, and artistic periods in French civilization from the Middle Ages through the 18th century. Readings, lectures, discussions, films, and presentations. Prerequisite: Two years of college French or equivalent. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

FREN 314. FRENCH CIVILIZATION II
Continued study of the principal historical, political, and artistic periods in French civilization, with an emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. Readings, lectures, discussions, films, and presentations. Prerequisite: Two years of college French or equivalent. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

FREN 315. BUSINESS FRENCH I
An introduction to business and technology in the French-speaking world from a personal, everyday life perspective. Study includes banking, telecommunications, computers, and the Internet. Prerequisite: Two years of college French or the equivalent. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

FREN 316. BUSINESS FRENCH II
Continued study of business and technology in the French-speaking world. Units include interviewing, resume writing, business correspondence, and corporate organization. Prerequisite: Two years of college French or the equivalent. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

FREN 380-389. SPECIAL TOPICS IN FRENCH
Topics of special interest related to French literature, language, or culture. Prerequisites:  French 302 and 312 and permission of instructor. Offered in Fall or Spring. One semester; one to three credits

FREN 400-410. RESEARCH TOPICS IN FRENCH
Original writing projects or independent study and research in literature, pursued under the guidance of a member of the French faculty. Syllabus and credit hours contracted by the student with the French professor. One semester each; one to three credits each

FREN 480-489. SPECIAL TOPICS IN FRENCH
Topics of special interest related to advanced study of French literature, language, or culture. Prerequisites: French 302 and 312 and permission of instructor. Offered in Fall or Spring. One semester, one to three credits

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GERMAN

GERM 101. ELEMENTARY GERMAN I
Fundamentals of grammar and pronunciation, elementary conversation. Second semester includes reading and translation of texts of graded difficulty. Not open for credit to native speakers of German. Offered the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

GERM 102. ELEMENTARY GERMAN II
Fundamentals of grammar and pronunciation, elementary conversation. Second semester includes reading and translation of texts of graded difficulty. Not open for credit to native speakers of German. Offered the Spring semester. Prerequisite: GERM 101. One semester; three credits

GERM 201. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I
A review of German grammar with composition and conversation. Second semester includes the reading of German short stories selected from German literature, designed to increase the student’s vocabulary and to contribute to his mastery of idiomatic constructions. Prerequisites: GERM 101 & 102. Not open for credit to native speakers of German. Offered the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

GERM 202. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II
A review of German grammar with composition and conversation. Second semester includes the reading of German short stories selected from German literature, designed to increase the student’s vocabulary and to contribute to his mastery of idiomatic constructions. Prerequisites: GERM 101 & 102. Not open for credit to native speakers of German. Offered the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

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SPANISH

SPAN 101. ELEMENTARY SPANISH I
Fundamentals of grammar and syntax. Intensive drills in understanding, speaking and reading. Fluency of oral-aural skills is the main objective. Not open for credit to native speakers of Spanish. Offered in sequence in the Fall and Spring. One semester; three credits

SPAN 102. ELEMENTARY SPANISH II
Fundamentals of grammar and syntax. Intensive drills in understanding, speaking and reading. Fluency of oral-aural skills is the main objective. Not open for credit to native speakers of Spanish. Offered in sequence in the Fall and Spring. Prerequisite: SPAN 101. One semester; three credits

SPAN 201. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I
Continued attention to essentials of grammar and composition. Readings in the short story and cultural texts. Not open for credit to native speakers of Spanish. Prerequisites: SPAN 101, 102. Offered in sequence in the Fall and Spring.One semester; three credits

SPAN 202. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II
Continued attention to essentials of grammar and composition. Readings in the short story and cultural texts. Not open for credit to native speakers of Spanish. Prerequisites: SPAN 101, 102. Offered in sequence in the Fall and Spring.One semester; three credits

SPAN 301. COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION I
Continued study of Spanish grammar and composition. Drill on difficult constructions and theme writing. Reports and discussions on selected aspects of Hispanic civilization. Not open for credit to native speakers of Spanish. Prerequisites: SPAN 201, 202 or the equivalent. Offered in sequence in the Fall and Spring. One semester; three credits

SPAN 302. COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION II
Continued study of Spanish grammar and composition. Drill on difficult constructions and theme writing. Reports and discussions on selected aspects of Hispanic civilization. Not open for credit to native speakers of Spanish. Prerequisites: SPAN 201, 202 or the equivalent. Offered in sequence in the Fall and Spring. One semester; three credits

SPAN 313, 314. SPANISH LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION
The study of the cultures of Spain and Latin America as reflected in their history, literature, and art from their origins to the present. Prerequisite: Two years of college Spanish or equivalent. Offered in sequence in the Fall and Spring. Two semesters; six credits

SPAN 316. BUSINESS SPANISH
An introduction to business and technology in the Spanish-speaking world from a personal, everyday life perspective. Study includes banking, telecommunications, computers, the Internet, corporate organization, interviewing, resume writing, and business correspondence. Prerequisite: Two years of college Spanish or the equivalent. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

SPAN 380-389. SPECIAL TOPICS IN SPANISH.
Topics of special interest related to Spanish literature, language, or culture. Prerequisite: Spanish 302 or 314 and permission of instructor. Offered in Fall or Spring. One semester; one to three credits

SPAN 400-410. RESEARCH TOPICS IN SPANISH
Original writing projects or independent study and research in literature, pursued under the guidance of a member of the Spanish faculty. Syllabus and credit hours contracted by the student with the Spanish professor. One semester each; one to three credits

SPAN 480-489. SPECIAL TOPICS IN SPANISH.
Topics of special interest related to advanced study of Spanish literature, language, or culture. Prerequisite: Spanish 302 or 314 and permission of instructor. Offered in Fall or Spring. One semester; one to three credits

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LANGUAGE COURSES OFFERED AT RHODES COLLEGE

FORN LANG 101, 102. SPECIAL TOPICS IN FOREIGN LANGUAGES
The study of a language other than French, German or Spanish. Offered in sequence in the Fall and Spring. Two semesters; six credits

FORN LANG 301, 302, 401, 402. FOREIGN LANGUAGE UPPER-LEVEL COURSES
The study of upper-level courses in foreign languages. Four semesters; twelve credits

GREK 101-102. ELEMENTARY GREEK
This series of courses introduces students to the fundamentals of the ancient Greek language. Although the primary goal of the elementary sequence of courses through Greek 201 is to prepare students to use ancient Greek documents in a wide variety of academic contexts, students will develop all four language skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Offered in sequence in Fall and Spring. Two semesters; eight credits

GREK 201. INTERMEDIATE GREEK
This course concludes the elementary language sequence and prepares students for more advanced work in the language. During this course students will make the transition from graded selections in the elementary texts to authentic ancient texts primarily from the fifth and fourth centuries BCE. In addition to developing their ability to comprehend and interpret ancient texts, students will continue to work on their aural-oral proficiency. Prerequisite: Greek 102 or the equivalent. Offered in Fall. One semester; four credits

GREK 265. TOPICS IN GREEK LITERATURE
In this course advanced students of ancient Greek will read and analyze texts from major works of literature. It will feature materials organized thematically, generically, by period, or by author. Texts in this course will generally represent significant documents for the study of the cultural and literary history of the Greek society and may also be the subjects of study in other courses offered at Rhodes both by GRS and other disciplines. The course will help students develop greater reading fluency and expand their understanding of interpretative approaches. The course will generally be taught as a four-credit course. Students in special circumstances may take the course for one, two, or three credits with the permission of the instructor. The course may be repeated for credit if the topic differs. Prerequisite: Greek 201 or the equivalent. Offered in Fall. One semester; one to four credits

GREK 291/391. HOMERIC POETRY
This course, making extensive use of resources available via the internet, focuses on the earliest literary documents in the Greek language, the poems attributed to Homer. Readings will come primarily from the Iliad and Odyssey, but students should expect to do some work with the Hymns and the Hesiodic corpus as well. Students will participate in a weekly webcast lecture, an online discussion moderated by faculty members from institutions that participate in Sunoikisis (www.sunoikisis.org), and weekly tutorials with faculty members at Rhodes. This course is specifically designed for advanced students and will include a rigorous study of the cultural and historical context during the Archaic Period of Greek history as well as the issues of composition and transmission. Students will also become familiar with current interpretative approaches to the material. Prerequisite: Greek 265 or equivalent. Some familiarity with Greek history is strongly advised. Permission of the instructor is required. Offered in Fall. One semester; four credits

GREK 292/392. GREEK LYRIC POETRY
This course, making extensive use of resources available via the internet, focuses on the evolution of major types of Greek poetry, including elegy, monodic lyric, and choral lyric. Students will participate in a weekly webcast lecture, an online discussion moderated by faculty members from institutions that participate in Sunoikisis (www.sunoikisis.org), and weekly tutorials with faculty members at Rhodes. This course is specifically designed for advanced students and will include a rigorous study of the cultural and historical context of the Archaic Period. Students will also become familiar with current interpretative approaches to the material. Prerequisite: Greek 265 or equivalent. Some familiarity with Greek history and Homeric poetry is strongly advised. Permission of the instructor is required. Offered in Fall. One semester; four credits

GREK 293/393. GREEK COMEDY
This course, making extensive use of resources available via the internet, focuses on the work of the Athenian comic playwrights. Students will participate in a weekly webcast lecture, an online discussion moderated by faculty members from institutions that participate in Sunoikisis (www.sunoikisis.org), and weekly tutorials with faculty members at Rhodes. This course is specifically designed for advanced students and will include a rigorous study of the cultural and historical context during the 5th and 4th centuries BCE. Students will also become familiar with the current interpretative approaches to the material. Prerequisite: Greek 265 or equivalent. Some familiarity with Greek history, Homeric poetry, the work of the lyric poets, and the literature of the 5th century is strongly advised. Permission of the instructor is required. Offered in Fall. One semester; four credits

GREK 294/394. LITERATURE OF THE 4TH CENTURY BCE
This course, making extensive use of resources available via the internet, focuses on the work of the Athenian historians, orators, and philosophers who were active in the 4th  century BCE. Students will participate in a weekly webcast lecture, an online discussion moderated by faculty members from institutions that participate in Sunoiksis (www.sunoikisis.org), and weekly tutorials with faculty members at their home institutions. This course is specifically designed for advanced students and will include a rigorous study of the cultural and historical context during the 4th  century BCE. Students will also become familiar with the current interpretative approaches to the material. Prerequisite: Greek 265 or equivalent. Some familiarity with Greek history, Homeric poetry, the work of the lyric poets, and the literature of the 5th  century is strongly advised. Permission of the instructor is required. Offered in Fall. One semester; four credits

GREK 295/395. HELLENISTIC LITERATURE
This course, making extensive use of resources available via the internet, focuses on the evolution of Greek literature during the Hellenistic period, which begins with the conquest of Alexander the Great and the founding of the Museum at Alexandria by Ptolemy I Soter. Students will read and study the works of the major authors of the period: Callimachus, Theocritus, and Apollonius of Rhodes as well as epigrams from other writers including Meleager, Philodemus, and Posidippus. Students will participate in a weekly webcast lecture, an online discussion moderated by faculty members from institutions that participate in Sunoikisis (www.sunoikisis.org), and weekly tutorials with faculty members at Rhodes. This course is specifically designed for advanced students and will include a rigorous study of the cultural and historical context of the Hellenistic Period. Students will also become familiar with current interpretative approaches to the material. Prerequisite: Greek 265 or equivalent. Some familiarity with Greek history, Homeric poetry, the work of the lyric poets, and the literature of the 5th  century is strongly advised. Permission of the instructor is required. Offered in Fall. One semester; four credits

LATN 101-102. ELEMENTARY LATIN
An introduction to the fundamentals of the Latin language. Although the primary goal of the elementary sequence of courses through Latin 201 is to prepare students to use Latin documents in a wide variety of academic contexts, students will develop all four language skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Offered in sequence in Fall and Spring. Two semesters; eight credits

LATN 201. INTERMEDIATE LATIN
This course concludes the elementary language sequence and prepares students for more advanced work in the language. During this course students will begin making the transition from graded selections in the elementary texts to authentic ancient texts from a variety of Latin authors and genres from antiquity to the modern period. In addition to developing their ability to comprehend and interpret ancient texts, students will continue to work on their aural-oral proficiency. Prerequisite: Latin 102 or the equivalent. Offered in Fall. One semester; four credits

LATN 202. LATIN RHETORIC
In keeping with the pedagogy of the ancient schools of rhetoric, this course will provide an analytic and comprehensive review of the structures of the language. Students will work toward fluency in reading, composition, and conversation. Prerequisite: Latin 201 or the equivalent. Offered in Spring. One semester; four credits

LATN 232. LATIN IN ROME
An intensive reading course examining works of Latin literature pertinent to the study of the topography of Rome. Selections will come from Roman historians, poets, orators, and inscriptions. Class meetings will take place in the city of Rome. Students will visit and analyze sites described in the primary literature; inscriptions review in situ where possible, and study the textual tradition through available manuscripts. Prerequisite: Latin 201 or the equivalent. Offered in Summer. One semester; four credits

LATN 265. TOPICS IN LATIN LITERATURE
In this course advanced students of Latin will read and analyze texts from major works of literature. It will feature materials organized thematically, generically, by period, or by author. Texts in this course will generally represent significant documents for the study of the cultural and literary history of Roman society and may also be the subjects of study in other courses offered at Rhodes both by GRS and other disciplines. The course will help students develop greater reading fluency and expand their understanding of interpretative approaches. The course will generally be taught as a four-credit course. Students in special circumstances may take the course for one, two, or three credits with the permission of the instructor. The course may be repeated for credit if the topic differs. Prerequisite: Latin 201 or the equivalent. Offered in Fall and Spring. One semester; one to four credits

LATN 291/391. LATIN LITERATURE FROM THE EARLY REPUBLIC
This course, making extensive use of resources available via the internet, focuses on the earliest literary documents in the Latin language. Readings will come primarily from the comedies of Plautus and Terence, but students should expect to study other examples of archaic Latin such as the fragments of Ennius’ Annales. Students will participate in a weekly webcast lecture, an online discussion moderated by faculty members from institutions that participate in Sunoikisis (www.sunoikisis.org), and weekly tutorials with faculty members at Rhodes. This course is specifically designed for advanced students and will include a rigorous study of the cultural and historical context during the early Republic. Students will also become familiar with current interpretative approaches to the material. Prerequisite: Latin 265 or equivalent. Some familiarity with Roman history and the literature of the Augustan period is strongly advised. Permission of the instructor is required. Offered in Fall. One semester; four credits

LATN 292/392. LATIN LITERATURE FROM THE LATE REPUBLIC
This course, making extensive use of resources available via the internet, focuses on the literature of Rome during the Late Republic. Readings will come primarily from the work of Cicero, Catullus, Caesar, and Sallust. Students will participate in a weekly webcast lecture, an online discussion moderated by faculty members from institutions that participate in Sunoikisis (www.sunoikisis.org), and weekly tutorials with faculty members Rhodes. This course is specifically designed for advanced students and will include a rigorous study of the cultural and historical context during the Late Republic. Students will also become familiar with the current interpretative approaches to the material. Prerequisite: Latin 265 or equivalent. Some familiarity with Roman history and the literature of the Augustan period is strongly advised. Permission of the instructor is required. Offered in Fall. One semester; four credits

LATN 293/393. LITERATURE OF THE NEROIAN PERIOD
This inter-institutional collaborative course, making extensive use of resources available via the internet, explores the literature of the early Roman Empire, with a particular emphasis on the works of authors who were active during the period of Nero’s reign. These authors include Seneca, Lucan, and Petronius. Students will participate in a weekly webcast lecture, an online discussion moderated by faculty members from institutions that participate in Sunoikisis (www.sunoikisis.org), and weekly tutorials with faculty members at Rhodes. This course is specifically designed for advanced students and will include a rigorous study of the cultural and historical context during the early Principate. Prerequisite: Latin 265 or equivalent. Some familiarity with Roman history and the literature of the Augustan period is strongly advised. Permission of the instructor is required. Offered in Fall. One semester; four credits

LATN 294/394. ROMAN LITERATURE, 70-180 CE
This course, making extensive use of resources available via the internet, explores the society of the Roman Empire through the works of authors who were active during the period beginning with the reign of Vespasian and extending to the death of M. Aurelius. These authors include Martial, Statius, Tacitus, Pliny the Younger, Juvenal, and Apuleius. Students will participate in a weekly webcast lecture, an online discussion moderated by faculty members from institutions that participate in Sunoikisis (www.sunoikisis.org), and weekly tutorials with faculty members at Rhodes. This course is specifically designed for advanced students and will require extensive reading in more than one genre of Latin literature and a rigorous study of the cultural and historical context of Rome in the late first and second centuries CE. Prerequisite: Latin 265 or equivalent. Some familiarity with Roman history and the literature of the Augustan period is strongly advised. Permission of the instructor is required. Offered in Fall. One semester; four credits

LATN 295/395. LATIN LITERATURE FROM LATE ANTIQUITY AND THE MIDDLE AGES
This course examines the literature produced during and after the dissolution of the Roman empire, beginning approximately with the reforms of Diocletian and Constantine and concluding with the renaissance of secular education in the twelfth century. Texts will include selections from the work of Jerome, Augustine, Prudentius, Alcuin of York, Einhard, Hrotsvitha of Gandersheim, Abelard, Heloise, Hildegard of Bingen, and Walter of Chatillon. Students will participate in a weekly webcast lecture, an online discussion moderated by faculty members from institutions that participate in Sunoikisis (www.sunoikisis.org), and weekly tutorials with faculty members at Rhodes. This course is specifically designed for advanced students and will require extensive reading in more than one genre of Latin literature and a rigorous study of the cultural and historical context of Rome and the Latin-speaking world after 180 CE. Prerequisite: Latin 265 or equivalent. Some familiarity with Roman history and the literature of the Augustan period is strongly advised. Permission of the instructor is required. Offered in Fall. One semester; four credits

RUSS 101-102. ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN
Elementary grammar, reading, and conversation, supplemented by materials on Russian culture. Offered in sequence in Fall and Spring. Two semesters; eight credits

RUSS 201-202. INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN
Intermediate grammar and continued training in conversation and composition, supplemented by assignments in the Language Center. Reading of Russian texts of graded difficulty. Prerequisite: Russian 102 or the equivalent. Offered in sequence in Fall and Spring. Two semesters; eight credits

RUSS 209/309. RUSSIAN IN RUSSIA
A 3-4 week guided encounter with the language and culture aimed at solidifying vocabulary and grammar previously acquired. A significant cultural component is part of the course. Takes place in May-June. Offered in Summer. One semester; four credits

RUSS 301-302. ADVANCED RUSSIAN
Advanced grammar, with greater emphasis on the refinement of conversation and composition skills. Discussion of topics related to contemporary life in Russia. Prerequisite: Russian 202 or equivalent. Offered in sequence in Fall and Spring. Two semesters; eight credits

RUSS 306. PHONETICS
Practice in Russian sounds, especially those that tend to be problematic for a non-native speaker. Emphasis on specific phonetic phenomena, such as palatalization and assimilation of consonants, and reduction of unstressed vowels. Examination of word stress, sentence-level stress, and intonation patterns. Corequisite: Course should be taken as early as possible in the study of Russian, but must be taken as a co-requisite with Russian 301. Offered in Fall. One semester; one credit

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