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Courses

ME 112. SCIENTIFIC PROGRAMMING
This course covers fundamental programming techniques used to solve engineering problems that require repetitive  or iterative calculations. Emphasis is placed on writing structured, portable, efficient, and understandable MATLAB and Excel programs. Corequisite: MATH 131. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

ME 121. SOLIDS MODELING
Emphasis on visual aspects of engineering communications, expression of ideas, developing spatial concepts as related to design. Design is taught using 3-D modeling and parametric design. CAD applications. Offered in the Fall and Spring. One semester; three credits

ME 201. MANUFACTURING PROCESSES
Production of common engineering materials. Heat treatment theory and processes. Study of machining, casting, metal forming, fabrication of plastics, ceramics, composites, welding, inspection, material testing, automation. Plant tours. Reports. Demonstrations. Two lectures and one three-hour lab each week. Prerequisite: ME 121. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

ME 202. DYNAMICS
Kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies in two dimensions. Force-mass-acceleration, work-energy, and impulse-momentum methods will be covered. Prerequisites: CE 201. Offered in the Fall and Spring. One semester; three credits

ME 301. ENGINEERING INSTRUMENTATION LABORATORY
A laboratory course designed to instruct the student in the theory and use of various engineering instruments and transducers. Emphasis is placed on appropriate error analysis in the reduction, analysis, and reporting of data. Technical report preparation is emphasized. Two lecture periods and one laboratory period of three hours. (Same as ECE 201)  Prerequisite: ECE 221. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; two credits

ME 302. ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY
Experimental study of basic fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena, flow-measurements, impulse turbine, centrifugal pump, fluid circuit systems, electrical analogies, basic heat conduction experiments, free and forced convention, thermal radiation, temperature measurements, subsonic wind tunnel model studies, lift and drag measurements. Technical report preparation and presentation is emphasized. One laboratory period of three hours and lecture. Prerequisites: ME 301, 313. Corequisite: ME 306. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; two credits

ME 305. ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS I
Fundamental laws and concepts of the macroscopic approach to the thermodynamics of pure materials.   Properties of pure materials from tables, charts and ideal-gas equation. Heat and work.  First and second law analysis of open and closed systems.  Introduction to heat engines and heat pumps. (Same as CHE 231) Prerequisites: MATH 132 and CHEM 113 or 115. Corequisite: PHYS 150.  Offered in the Fall and Spring. One semester; three credits

ME 306. HEAT TRANSFER
An introductory treatment of conduction, convection, and radiation heat transfer. Analysis of steady and unsteady heat conduction in simple geometries, boundary layer analysis and empirical correlations for convection, and basic theory of radiation heat transfer. Prerequisite: ME 313. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

ME 312. MECHANICS OF DEFORMABLE SOLIDS
Axial load, shear, and bending moment diagrams. Differential equations of beams. Study of stresses due to axial, bending, torsional loads, and combined loading. Mohr’s circle of stress. Design techniques, Column design equations. Prerequisite: CE 201. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

ME 313. FLUID MECHANICS
Mechanical and thermodynamic properties of fluids. Theory of fluid statics. Conservation laws in integral and differential form. Dimensional analysis and dimensionless groups. Dynamics of frictionless incompressible flow. Modified Bernoulli equation. Flow of viscous fluids. Pipe flow theory. Empirical formulas and charts. Introduction to boundary layer theory, turbulent flow, and one-dimensional steady compressible flow. Prerequisites: MATH 232 and ME 202, 305 (or CHE 231). Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

ME 314. ENGINEERING ECONOMY (Formerly ME 314 Engineering Factors in Design)
Fundamentals of engineering economy. Cost concepts. Time value of money and equivalence. Economic analysis of alternatives. Depreciation and after-tax analysis. Effects of inflation on economic analysis. Currency exchange rates. Effects of global economic issues on engineering decision making. Prerequisite:  MATH 132. (Same as CHE 314, ECE 314, CE 314) One semester; three credits

ME 316. ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS II
Concepts of reversibility, irreversibility, and availability. Power and refrigeration systems. First Law analysis of gas-vapor mixtures. Introduction to psychrometry. Thermochemical reactions including combustion processes, fuel properties, and equilibrium composition. Prerequisite ME 305 or CHE 231. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

ME 317. KINEMATICS
A study of relative motion and geometry of machine parts and mechanisms without reference to force or mass. Graphical and analytical solutions for the displacement, velocity, and acceleration of planar mechanisms. General case of acceleration including Coriolis component. Computer programming and numerical techniques applied to velocity and acceleration analysis of cycles. Prerequisites: ME 112, 121, 202. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

ME 318. DYNAMICS OF MACHINES
The dynamic analysis of machine parts by use of the principles of linear and angular momentum and the work-energy relationships. Graphical and analytical methods. Analysis and balancing of shaking forces in machines, flywheel analysis, basic gear analysis, gyroscopic forces in machines. Three lectures each week. Prerequisite: ME 317. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

ME 319. PRINCIPLES OF PACKAGING
Overview of the historical development of packaging, the system of packaging science, along with information about economic importance, social implications and packaging as a profession. Study of the functions of packaging and materials, container types, processes, technology and equipment employed to protect goods during handling, shipping and storage. Introduction of package development process, packaging testing and evaluation methods, standards, and equipment. Brief review of governmental regulations affecting packaging. Prerequisites: MATH 131 and CHEM 113 or 115.  (Same as CH E 319 and PKG 319). One semester; three credits

ME 320. DISTRIBUTION/MEDICAL DEVICE PACKAGING
Overview of physical distribution systems, various distribution hazards imposed to products/packages in transit, rules and regulations governing distribution packaging, and common industry guidelines and practices on distribution packaging. Study of the package design process, protective packaging theories and applications, selection and design, other distribution packaging related materials and applications. Introduction to package testing and evaluation methods, standards, and equipment/systems. Introduction to basics of packaging materials, packaging design and development, and sterilization methods used in biomedical industry. (Same as ChE 320 and PKG 320) Prerequisites: MATH 131 and CHEM 113 or 115. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

ME 400. THE COMPLEAT ENGINEER
This course deals with a wide array of issues facing the practicing engineer. Topics include: engineering ethics; regulatory issues; health, safety, and environmental factors; reliability, maintainability, produciblity, sustainability; and the context of engineering in the enterprise, in society, and as part of the global economy. (Same as CH E 400, ECE 400, and CE 400). Prerequisite: Permission of the department and MATH 232. One semester; three credits

ME 401. MECHANICAL SYSTEMS LABORATORY
Laboratory experiments are performed in stress analysis and experimental mechanics on a project team basis. Emphasis is placed on experimental technique, data analysis and report preparation and presentation. Each student also prepares a state of the art report on a topic selected by the department faculty. Prerequisite: ME 301. Corequisite: ME 420. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; two credits

ME 407-408. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROJECT
Industry sponsored projects are initiated early in the first semester of the student’s senior year and are completed and formally presented in a report (written and oral) to the sponsor, faculty and students in the following semester. Prerequisite: Permission of the department, ME 407 prerequisite for ME 408. Taken in sequence in the Fall and Spring. Two semesters; six credits

ME 416. THERMAL ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING
Refrigeration, vapor compression and absorption. Psychrometrics, basic air-conditioning processes, physiological effects, heat load calculations. Air conditioning system design will be emphasized. Three lectures each week. Prerequisites: ME 306, 316. One semester; three credits

ME 419. MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS
Fundamentals of vibration theory applied to mechanical systems. Un-damped and damped, single and multiple degree of freedom, vibrating systems. Steady state analysis of free and forced vibrations; critical speeds and balancing, vibration isolation, instrumentation. Three lectures each week. Prerequisites: ME 202 and MATH 231. One semester; three credits

ME 420. MACHINE DESIGN
An integrated treatment of the design of mechanical systems combining static and dynamic load analysis, stress analysis, material selection, and failure analysis. Includes many advanced topics in stress analysis. Three lectures each week. Prerequisites: ME 312 and 318. Corequisite: ME 401. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

ME 421. THERMAL SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN
An integrated treatment of the analysis and design of thermal systems. Primarily concerned with industrial thermal processes, cycles and associated equipment. Prerequisite: ME 306. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

ME 422. CONTROL SYSTEMS ENGINEERING
Analysis and design of linear control systems. Transfer functions, block diagrams, and state-variable representation. Feedback concepts and stability analysis in both the frequency and time domain. Design by Root locus, Bode plots, and State variable methods. Emphasis on use of computational software for complex cases. (Same as ECE 322 Linear Control Systems) Prerequisites: MATH 231, ME 202 and ECE 221. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

ME 428. MATERIALS SCIENCE
Material classification, behavior, properties and selection. The internal structures of metals, ceramics, polymers and electronic materials are examined to develop understanding of their mechanical, physical, chemical, electrical properties. Develop some insight to controlling of properties and behavior of materials by manipulating internal structures. (Same as CHE 328) Prerequisites: CHEM 113 or CHEM 115 and Junior standing. One semester; three credits

ME 429. SELECTION OF MATERIALS
Importance of materials selection as part of the design process will be discussed. Fundamental relationships that govern the properties of materials will be examined and used to optimize the selection of engineering materials. Materials covered will include metals, plastics, ceramics, and composites. Prerequisite: ME 312. One semester; three credits

ME 432. PRINCIPLES OF GAS DYNAMICS
Concepts of compressible flow. Steady streamtube flow. Supersonic flow and shock waves. Prandtl-Meyer flow. Supersonic nozzle and diffuser flow. Fanno and Rayleigh flow. Unsteady one-dimensional flow. Prerequisite: ME 313. One semester; three credits

ME 435. INTERMEDIATE MANUFACTURING
Introduction to advanced parametric computer-aided design and manufacturing (CADM) techniques. Students learn to design parts and assemblies using tools that enable parametric design. A design project is carried through from “blank screen” to production of computer numerical control (CNC) code and fabrication. Also provided is an introduction to structural and thermal analysis tools that are integrated with the CADM program. An oral report on advanced manufacturing technology is required. Occasional field trips to local manufacturing facilities. Prerequisites: ME 201 and permission of instructor. One semester; three credits

ME 442. INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
Principles of spark ignition and compression engines. Both two and four-stroke engines are considered. Fuel combustion, cooling, and turbocharging effects. Experimental methods of determining engine performance. Guest lecturers and plant tours. Prerequisites: ME 306, 316. One semester; three credits

ME 495. INTERNSHIP IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Students majoring in mechanical engineering may be placed in the engineering offices of contracted firms to receive job training under the supervision of qualified engineers. Tasks completed as part of the internship must be approved by an authorized work supervisor. Credit is granted upon faculty approval of periodic review reports and a final summary report describing the work performed. Minimum time 200 hours. Prerequisites: Junior standing and Permission of the department. Pass/Fail Grading. One semester; three credits

ME 496-498. TOPICS IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Lectures, readings, discussions and research on special areas and advancements in mechanical engineering. Problems or projects of an interdisciplinary nature are encouraged. A written report may be required. Prerequisites: Senior standing and Approval of department. One semester; one to three credits

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