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Courses

The Packaging Department at CBU offers the following UNDERGRADUATE and GRADUATE courses:

UNDERGRADUATE

PKG 101. INTRODUCTION TO PACKAGING
Introduction to various areas of packaging industry, including distribution packaging, medical device packaging, food packaging; materials, including plastic and paper; and skills, including business, science/engineering, and graphic design. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; one credit 

PKG 200. MECHANICS OF SOLIDS
Principles of statics; coplanar and non-coplanar force systems. Equilibrium of force systems. Centroids and moment of inertia. Axial load, shear and moment diagrams. Study of stresses due to axial, bending, and torsional loading. Design applications. Prerequisite: PHYS 150. One semester; three credits. This course can be replaced by CE201 STATICS and CE202 INTRO TO MECH OF MATERIALS

PKG 201. PACKAGING SEMINARS
Current practice and issues in packaging industry. Presentations by packaging professionals. One semester; one credit 

PKG 319. PRINCIPLES OF PACKAGING
Overview of the historical development of packaging, the system of packaging science, along with information about economic importance, social implications and packaging as a profession. Study of the functions of packaging and materials, container types, processes, technology and equipment employed to protect goods during handling, shipping and storage. Introduction of package development process, packaging testing and evaluation methods, standards, and equipment. Brief review of governmental regulations affecting packaging. (Same as ChE 320 and ME 320) Prerequisites: MATH 131 and CHEM 113 or 115. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

PKG 320. DISTRIBUTION/MEDICAL DEVICE PACKAGING
Overview of physical distribution systems, various distribution hazards imposed to products/packages in transit, rules and regulations governing distribution packaging, and common industry guidelines and practices on distribution packaging. Study of the package design process, protective packaging theories and applications, selection and design, other distribution packaging related materials and applications. Introduction to package testing and evaluation methods, standards, and equipment/systems. Introduction to basics of packaging materials, packaging design and development, and sterilization methods used in biomedical industry. (Same as ChE/ME 320) Prerequisites: MATH 131 and CHEM 113 or 115. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits.

PKG 490. PACKAGING PROJECTS
Individual projects related to packaging. Reports are presented in both oral and written form. Prerequisites: PKG 319 and 320. One semester; two credits

PKG 495. PACKAGING INTERNSHIP
Students are placed in packaging related facilities under the supervision of qualified packaging professionals. Tasks completed as part of the internship must be approved by an authorized work supervisor. Credit is granted upon faculty approval of periodic review reports and a final summary report describing the work performed. Minimum time 200 hours. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and permission of the department. One semester; three credits

GRADUATE

ENGM 640. PRINCIPLES OF PACKAGING
Packaging materials, container types, processes, technology, and equipment. Packaging development process, testing and evaluation methods, standards, and equipment. Government regulations. Special projects. Three credits

ENGM 641. DISTRIBUTION AND MEDICAL DEVICE PACKAGING
Physical distribution systems and distribution hazards. Rules and regulations governing distribution packaging and industry guidelines and prac- tices. Basics of packaging materials, forms and sterilization methods used in biomedical industry. Packaging design, development, and validation. Special projects. Three credits

ENGM 642. SUSTAINABILITY 
Sustainability criteria and sustainable packaging. Steps to sustainable packaging. Design for optimizing materials and energy. Real-life design and material innovations. Life cycle assessment, examples and carbon footprints. Current state of implementations of sustainable packaging. Special projects. Three credits