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Courses

PAS 620. INTRODUCTION TO THE PA PROFESSION
This course introduces students to the physician assistant profession. Topics of discussion include history of the profession, national and state organizations, federal and state laws affecting practice, education, integrity, developing a team approach to healthcare, diversity and cultural bias, and discussing the future of the profession. One credit

PAS 601. HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY / PATHOPHYSIOLOGY I
This course provides a comprehensive study of human gross anatomy. A regional approach is used to study the structures and organ systems of the extremities and trunk in order to differentiate between the normal and the abnormal. The clinical significance of topographical and radiological anatomical features is emphasized. Lectures are complemented by laboratory study of prosected cadavers, anatomic models, simulated and real dissection, and surface anatomy. Five credits

PAS 602. HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY / PATHOPHYSIOLOGY II 
Study of the physiological function of the cell and organ systems and the basic pathological and pathophysiological concepts of disease conditions will be discussed in this course. Students will learn to identify signs and symptoms of various medical conditions using a systemic approach. Systems to be covered in this course include: cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproductive, nervous, musculoskeletal, special senses, lymphatic, endocrine and integument. Course topics will integrate with the corresponding topics presented in Human Anatomy. Five credits

PAS 603. PUBLIC HEALTH 
Students explore relevant health-care policy issues that impact healthcare delivery systems and the Physician Assistant profession. Students will learn to promote a lifestyle of healthy choices and focus on prevention of disease. Areas of discussion address global health issues, identifying com- munity resources, community responses to acts of destruction and addressing barriers such as cultural bias that might affect public health access, and differences in health care. Two credits

PAS 604. MEDICAL ETHICS AND LAW
Contemporary professional medical issues are discussed and debated. Issues discussed include ethical theories and issues as they apply to the PA and PA/physician team, medical law, and developing a basic understanding of the current healthcare delivery system. One credit

PAS 605. RESEARCH METHODS 
Students receive instruction in research methods and application in the clinical setting. Students will locate, appraise and integrate evidence from scientific studies, develop skills to apply this knowledge to their patients, apply knowledge of study designs and statistical methods to determine diagnostic and therapeutic effectiveness. Students are prepared to critically read published reports of clinical research and identify strengths and weaknesses and bring this to their practice in an efficient and cost-effective manner to ultimately benefit patient care. Two credits

PAS 606. CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS I
This clinically oriented course provides students with knowledge required for the safe and effective use of pharmaceutical agents in the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of diseases through an understanding of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Two credits

PAS 607. CLINICAL MEDICINE I
This course presents an organ-systems approach to the principles of acute and chronic disease processes in clinical medicine. Course involves a review of basic anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology. Emphasis is placed on etiology of disease, recognition of signs and symptoms, development of differential diagnosis, diagnosis, prognosis, management, patient education, indications for referral, and disease prevention. Course addresses medical conditions related to hematology, oncology, cardiology, pulmonology, and infectious disease. Nine credits

PAS 608. HISTORY & PHYSICAL I
Lecture and practical laboratory course covering theory and application of interviewing skills, history and physical examination skills, elicitation and documentation of patient data, and clinical procedures. Students demonstrate competence through practical evaluations, written documenta- tion, and oral presentations. Three credits

PAS 609. CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS II
This is a continuation of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics I. This clinically oriented course provides students with knowledge required for the safe and effective use of pharmaceutical agents in the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of diseases through an understanding of pharmaco-kinetics and pharmacodynamics. Two credits

PAS 610. CLINICAL MEDICINE II
This is a continuation of Clinical Medicine I course. This course continues to present a systems approach to the principles of disease processes; a review of basic anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology; an emphasis on etiology of disease; recognition of signs and symptoms; development of a differential diagnosis, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, patient education, disease prevention. This course section covers medical conditions related to renal, endocrine, neurological, and gastrointestinal systems. Nine credits

PAS 611. HISTORY & PHYSICAL II
A continuation of Physical & History I. Lecture and practical laboratory course covering theory and application of interviewing skills, history and physical examination skills, elicitation and documentation of patient data, and clinical procedures. Students demonstrate competence through practical evaluations, written documentation, and oral presentations. Three credits

PAS 612. CLINICAL SKILLS I
This is the first of two courses that will focus on the development of a variety of clinical skills and procedures. Course covers indications, contra- indications, precautions, complications, techniques, cost effectiveness and patient preparation while addressing issues of promoting a safe environ- ment, addressing cultural sensitivity, practicing ethical and cost-effective medicine and providing and maintaining a sound relationship with the patient. Three credits

PAS 613. CLINICAL LABORATORY & MEDICAL GENETICS
This course identifies and describes common laboratory tests, demonstrates what types of laboratory tests to order for specific diseases and disorders, and reviews basic interpretation of laboratory test results. Ordering and interpreting genetic testing and application of genetic information and results in the primary care setting will be discussed. Two credits

PAS 614. CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS III
A continuation of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics II, this clinically oriented course provides students with knowledge required for the safe and effective use of pharmaceutical agents in the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of diseases through an understanding of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. One credit

PAS 615. CLINICAL MEDICINE III
This is a continuation of Clinical Med I & II studying the etiology, presentation, evaluation and management of various diseases and disorders. Instructional emphasis is on the etiology of disease, signs and symptoms, differential diagnosis, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, patient education, disease prevention. The topics covered in this course include medical conditions of the eyes, ears, nose and throat (EENT); pediatrics, and der- matology disorders. There will be emphasis on pediatric nutrition, screening and prevention, adolescent medicine, special and acute issues in the pediatric population. In addition, the course will cover topics relevant to Geriatric medicine including, general principles of geriatric principles of hospice and palliative care, and death and dying. Five credits

PAS 616. INTRODUCTION TO EMERGENCY MEDICINE
This course is designed to provide the students with an introduction and an overview to the discipline of Emergency Medicine. Emphasis will also be placed on acute care and surgical conditions. All students are expected to complete ACLS and PALS training included within this course curriculum. Two credits

PAS 617. CLINICAL SKILLS II
This is a continuation of Clinical Skills I. Course covers indications, contraindications, precautions, complications, techniques, cost effectiveness and patient preparation while addressing issues of promoting a safe environment, addressing cultural sensitivity, practicing ethical and cost-effective medicine and providing and maintaining a sound relationship with the patient. Students will also be required to complete a Summative evalua- tion focusing on history taking and physical examination performance skills, as well as communication and clinical reasoning ability, the ability to summarize and document clinical encounter findings, and demonstration of psychomotor clinical and cognitive critical thinking skills, Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), and clinical procedure performance skill laboratories. Students will participate in a cumulative overview of the NCCPA “blueprint” and will learn strategies to facilitate exam success. They will also participate in a standardized test known as the “Packrat” used as a predictor for success on the PANCE certification exam. Three credits

PAS 618. BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE
This course is designed to provide the student with tools to evaluate, diagnose, and manage psychiatric conditions. Students will gain an appreciation for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) classifications of mental illness as well as the importance of timely referrals to other healthcare professionals. Information will be provided on behavioral issues that impact health, the genetic and environmental aspects of behavioral disorders, etiology and treatment of substance abuse, responses and coping mechanisms for stress, growth and development, life cycle development, personality development, human sexuality, death and dying and bereavement. Two credits

PAS 625. SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics in Physician Assistant Studies. One to nine credits

PAS 626. SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics in Physician Assistant Studies. One to nine credits

Three courses — PAS 730 GRAND CLINICAL ROTATIONS I, PAS 740 GRAND CLINICAL ROTATIONS II, and PAS 750 GRAND CLINICAL ROTATIONS III — are offered sequentially over three semesters beginning in the 5th Semester of the MSPAS program. The 5th Semester coincides with the Summer Term of the University Schedule. Students are assigned into clinical experiences from three main categories: Required, Selective, and Elective. In addition, students will participate in scheduled workshops and other program-initiated activities that support the clinical experience. Assessments on clinical components include but are not limited to:

  • Case Submissions and presentations
  • Individual research and reports
  • Serial objective examinations
  • End-of-rotation examination and evaluation
  • Preceptor assessment and evaluation

Each clinical experience component must be completed with a passing score of 70 or above. A student failing to achieve a passing score on a clinical component of any Grand Clinical Rotation will be required to enroll in a Physician Assistant Studies Special Topics Course. Enrollment in a Special Topics Course must be departmentally approved and is designed to allow the student to undergo additional instruction and clinical experience in the component. Enrollment cannot occur until completion of PAS 750 Grand Clinical Rotation III. Students must demonstrate at the completion of the Special Topics Course the acquisition of knowledge and clinical ability that is sufficient to facilitate entry into a primary care clinical practice.

PAS 725. SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics in Physician Assistant Studies. Eight credits

PAS 726. SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics in Physician Assistant Studies. Four credits

PAS 735. SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics in Physician Assistant Studies. Eight credits

PAS 736. SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics in Physician Assistant Studies. Four credits