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Popular Summer Courses

June Term 

CHEM 211. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I
This course uses both a mechanistic and functional-group approach to introduce organic concepts. Topics include bonding, functional groups, stereochemistry, acids and bases, and conformations. Mechanisms covered include electrophilic addition, SN2, SN1, E1, E2 and radical reactions. This course deals with compounds from the aliphatic series. Prerequisites: CHEM 113, CHEM 113L, CHEM 114, and CHEM 114L with a minimum grade of “C” in each course. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 211L. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

CHEM 211L. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY
This course is designed to teach the student the techniques of organic chemistry as well as to carry out reactions discussed in class. Some of the techniques presented are distillation, recrystallization, and extraction. The experiments will teach the proper methods of carrying out reactions. Prerequisites: CHEM 113, CHEM 113L, CHEM 114, and CHEM 114L with a minimum grade of “C” in each course. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 211. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; one credit.

PHYS 201. INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS I
A general physics course covering the topics of mechanics, heat, and sound. Designed primarily for biology majors. Prerequisite: High school algebra and trigonometry or MATH 117. Corequisite: PHYS 201L. Offered in the Fall semester. A student can receive credit for only one of PHYS 150 and PHYS 201. One semester; three credits

PHYS 201L. INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS I LABORATORY
Laboratory to accompany PHYS 201. Corequisite: PHYS 201. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; one credit

PHIL 220. CONTEMPORARY MORAL ISSUES
A philosophical examination of a number of significant and controversial contemporary moral problems. Topics will vary but may include abortion, capital punishment, sexual morality, animal rights, environmental ethics, freedom of speech, discrimination, and affirmative action. The treatment of these topics will develop in the context of the tradition of philosophical ethics. (PHIL 220 satisfies the “Moral Values” general education requirement). One semester; three credits                                                            

RS 200. UNDERSTANDING RELIGION
An introduction to religion through a comparative study of all aspects of religious experience in Christianity and other religious traditions. This course will address existential and theological questions through a study of scriptures, sacred reality, symbol, ritual, and ethics. One semester; three credits

July Term

PHYS 251. PHYSICS II
A second course in physics covering electric forces, electric fields, voltage, capacitance, current, resistance, magnetic forces, magnetic fields, induction, oscillations, and waves. Prerequisite PHYS 150. Corequisite: PHYS 251L. Offered in the Fall and Spring. One semester; three credits

PHYS 251L. PHYSICS II LABORATORY
Laboratory to accompany PHYS 251. Corequisite: PHYS 251. Offered in the Fall and Spring. One semester; one credit

RS 326. Social and Political Theologies
A critical examination of contemporary social and political theologies, such as liberation theology, black theology, feminist theology and womanist theology. Special attention will be given to the importance of social context in developing such theologies and their ways of drawing from and critiquing traditional Christian theological views. Prerequisite: any RS 200 level course. One semester; three credits

ME 305. ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS I
Fundamental laws and concepts of the macroscopic approach to the thermodynamics of pure materials. Properties of pure materials from tables, charts and ideal-gas equation. Heat and work. First and second law analysis of open and closed systems. Introduction to heat engines and heat pumps. (Same as CHE 231) Prerequisites: MATH 132. Corequisite: PHYS 150 and CHEM 113 or 115. Offered in the Fall and Spring. One semester; three credits